June 19th – Gloucester Fisherman

 

Gloucester and the Sea

From Wikipedia –

The town was an important shipbuilding center, and the first schooner was reputedly built there in 1713. The community developed into an important fishing port, largely due to its proximity to Georges Bank and other fishing banks off the east coast of Nova Scotia and Newfoundland. Gloucester’s most famous (and nationally recognized) seafood business was founded in 1849John Pew & Sons. It became Gorton-Pew Fisheries in 1906, and in 1957 changed its name to Gorton’s of Gloucester. The iconic image of the “Gorton’s Fisherman“, and the products he represents, are known throughout the country and beyond. Besides catching and processing seafood, Gloucester is also a center for fish research.

In the late 19th century, a large number of Portuguese immigrants, mainly from the Azores, came to Gloucester to work in the fishing industry. As well at that time many Italian immigrants, mostly from Sicily became fishermen as well. Many of their descendents still are fisherman today, although many live in Gloucester and have entered other areas of work. Personally, both demographics contributed to a specific culture of the city.

Seafaring and fishing have been, and still are, a very dangerous undertaking. In its over 350-year history, Gloucester has lost over 10,000 men to the Atlantic Ocean. The names of all the lost that are known are painted on a huge mural in the main staircase at City Hall, and also on a new memorial cenotaph on Stacy Boulevard. The list has continued to lengthen despite increased safety requirements.

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~ by emagedphotography on Thursday, June 19, 2008.

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